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priority queue

Similar to the priority seats in public transport or the priority boarding at airports for elderly and families - there should be a priority queue for voting. It should be for people with disabilities and other limitations.

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Similar to the priority seats in public transport or the priority boarding at airports for elderly and families - there should be a priority queue for voting.
It should be for people with disabilities and other limitations. I once witnessed a young mother with two children turn away from the voting booth, because the line was too long - so the priority queue should also be open to young parents and people with young children.

Building on the " A Genius Bar for Voting" concept as mentioned by Meena Kadri in the comments the priority queue should also give polling stations a space for different voting methods - paper ballot, audio booth, braille ballot, computer based voting, ...

Building on  Paul Reader's concept on interactive signage, the two queue system should have a smart signage that speaks and shows the next free polling booth. This helps to optimize the two queues. It ensures that all polling booths are in use, but that polling booth number 3 can be used exclusively for the priority queue if necessary.

How will this concept improve election accessibility for everyone?

It will reduce the barriers for people with limitations and will give a sense of community and respect at the the voting stations.

What kinds of resources – whether time, money, people, partnerships, technology or otherwise – will be needed to get this concept off the ground?

Not allot - it could be implemented as a standard procedure with extra queuing lines and additional signage to help creates awareness.

My Virtual Team

This is based IDEO Palo Alto's concept of "Rethinking Election Queues"
Meena Kadri
Daniel Castro
Paul Reader
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This has already been done in many countries. Typically there are dedicated queue lines for people with disabilities, having leg injuries, or even the wheelchair bound older folks who can't walk properly. It's pretty organized here in Singapore as there are plenty of voting centres. On average, an area consisting 5,000 people will be assigned to a voting centre, typically a school with 6 full voting lines. Hence it's not congested and you don't really have a queue problem. Therefore, we could easily have a priority queue.


Edmund Ng
http://www.internetempire.com.sg

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